Documents (41)

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History RePPPeated - How public private partnerships are failing

Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) are increasingly being promoted as the solution to the shortfall in financing needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Economic infrastructure, such as railways, roads, airports and ports, but also key services such as health, education, water and electricity are being delivered through PPPs in both the global north and south. This report gives an in-depth, evidence-based analysis of the impact of 10 PPP projects that have taken place across four continents, in both developed and developing countries. These case studies build on research conducted by civil society experts in recent years and have been written by the people who often work with and around the communities affected by these projects.

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From Transactions to Changemaking: Rethinking Partnerships between the Public and Private Sectors

This report published by the New Local Government Network (NLGN) is a new voice to the debate on the role of the private sector in the delivery of public services. While the current debate remains unhelpfully polarised along party lines, we argue that partnerships between the public and private sectors must fundamentally change – from an approach that is primarily transactional in nature, to one that is changemaking.

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'Blended Finance' - Lipstick On The Public-Private Partnership Pig?

Tom Groenfeldt, FORBES. Public Private Partnerships, (PPPs), which are a controversial source of funding for government projects, are back at the current World Bank IMF meetings in Washington, under a new name — Blended Finance. Proponents say that blended finance is a way to fund the $2.5 trillion a year needed to “support progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set forth by the United Nations." While the name is new, the concept of joint funding isn't. Wikipedia says that “The concept of blended finance was first recognized as a solution to the funding gap in the outcome document of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development in July 2015.”

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Public Private Partnerships in the EU: Widespread shortcomings and limited benefits

The European Court of Auditors (ECA’s) special reports set out the results of its audits of EU policies and programmes, or of management-related topics from specific budgetary areas. The ECA selects and designs these audit tasks to be of maximum impact by considering the risks to performance or compliance, the level of income or spending involved, forthcoming developments and political and public interest. Speaking ahead of the ECA’s report release, PSI Deputy General Secretary, David Boys said: “For decades trade unions, civil society groups and the wider public fought against the failed privatisation agenda. Now that the EU’s very own financial watchdog is clearly saying PPPs are a bad idea, it’s surely time for leaders to take note.”

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Privatization Watch Issue 01/2018

This PSI bulletin provides an overview of global trends in privatization of public services and is part of PSI’s global campaign against privatization.

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Public-Private Partnerships: Defusing the ticking time bomb.

Download report A new briefing from Eurodad reveals how the increased promotion of public-private partnerships (PPPs) by the World Bank and others is having a disastrous impact on both developed and developing countries. From the hospital in Lesotho which has swallowed up a quarter of the country's health budget, to the motorways which nearly bankrupted the Portuguese government - we expose how PPPs are enriching the already wealthy whilst ripping off citizens.

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PPPs and the SDGs: Don't believe the hype!

This study, written by Jeff Powell of the Public Services International Research Unit at Greenwich University, draws on extensive research and outlines a range of issues with PPPs which are often ignored including the lack of real efficiency gains, higher long term costs and the rife opportunities for corruption.

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PSIRU's brief on "categorical errors on water renationalisation"

This PSIRU Brief, written by Emanuele Lobina, discusses some of the categorical errors mainstream economists make in predicting the outcome of water renationalisation. It argues that these errors are due to the misrepresentation of the ethos and motivation of the public and private sectors.

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