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Documents (9)

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Private Prisons and Investment Risks (Part II). How Private Prison Companies Fuel Mass Incarceration — and How Public Pension Funds Are at Risk

This is the AFT’s second report in a two - part series highlighting the investment risks to pension funds and other investors whose portf olios contain investments in the private prison industry or contractors who provide services to immigrant detention centers. Part 1 of this series, “Private Prisons, Immigrant Detention and Investment Risks,” released in August 2018, identifies investment managers, namely hedge fund managers, who invest milli ons of dollars in companies that profit from detention facilities that house separated immigrant families and the risks those investments pose to our members’ retirement security. Part 2 of this series focuses on the companies and asset managers, namely private equity firms, that profit from and fuel the mass incarceration of black and brown people in the United States.

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Prison Privatisation in Australia: The State of the Nation Accountability. Costs, Performance and Efficiency.

The purpose of this report is to provide a description of Australian private prisons as they have evolved across the country. Our overview of private prisons in Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia,Victoria and Western Australia will give an understanding of the ‘State of the Nation’ with regard to prison privatisation and its impact. As stated, this study considers private prisons in Australia against four key categories: accountability, costs, performance and efficiency.

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Buying Influence. How Private Prison Companies Expand Their Control of America’s Criminal Justice System

"In the Public Interest" has published a comprehensive report on how private prison companies are buying influence to expand their control of the U.S. criminal justice system. This report explores the ways corrections companies influence public officials. It is divided into three sections, each of which studies a separate avenue of influence: campaign contributions, lobbying, and professional corrections associations.

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Review of the Federal Bureau of Prisons’ Monitoring of Contract Prisons

Office of the Inspector Genera U.S. Department off Justice. Inspector General’s report states that, “in most key areas, contract prisons incurred more safety and security incidents per capita than comparable BOP [Bureau of Prison] institutions,” and that, “in recent years, disturbances in several federal contract prisons resulted in extensive property damage, bodily injury, and the death of a correctional officer”.

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Fact Sheet: Prisons for Profit.

Private prison companies claim to provide safe facilities that save taxpayers money. In reality, private prisons are more dangerous for inmates and staff, and often fail to deliver the savings they promise. Yet despite their track record of failure, private prison companies continue to secure contracts, spending millions on lobbyists and campaign donations to influence elected officials.

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