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External articles (10)

Efforts to partially privatize the national pension scheme have been met with skepticism

Efforts to partially privatize the national pension scheme have been met with skepticism and calls for reform to improve its operation. President Museveni is not supporting the bill. “In 2015, at one of the NSSF celebrations, the President said: ‘Some people have been coming to me with this idea that the sector will be more efficient when private players are allowed in, but I just kept quiet. I have never opposed or supported the proposed reforms.’ He continued: ‘Unless these people who are pushing for liberalization are saying that NSSF is being mismanaged, they will really have to convince me more.’ At the same function, he observed: ‘Having one player has one good advantage that we have money available for any useful capital development projects. (…) From the ULS, the Workers' Unions, the Workers' MPs and the NSSF, the message has been one: Amend the NSSF Act but do not repeal it.”

Source: allAfrica.com

Greece: people wonder when the pain will end

As the government signs on to another draconian agreement involving austerity and privatization with European institutions and the International Monetary Fund, its people wonder when the pain will end. “Mr. Tsipras's political opponents, who have been gaining ground in opinion polls, have noted that the country will remain under foreign supervision for years to come and will still be subject to harsh austerity measures, including a package approved by Parliament last week that includes further pension cuts, tax increases and privatization of state assets. That view is often echoed by regular Greeks. ‘What exit? This is a life sentence,’ said Giorgos Amanatidis, a 67-year-old pensioner in Athens. He added, ‘Taxes, taxes and more taxes.' Where's the light at the end of the tunnel? What kind of future do my grandchildren have here?’ The pace of privatizations has recently been accelerating.

Source: www.nytimes.com

The government is proposing to raise the superannuation entitlement (aged pension) age from 65 to 67

The government is proposing to raise the superannuation entitlement (aged pension) age from 65 to 67. The change is “scheduled to be phased in between 2037 and 2040, but could easily be brought forward as the underlying economic crisis deepens. Legislation for the change will be introduced in 2018, following this September’s national election. (…) The announcement represents a further escalation of the austerity measures implemented over the past decade. As in Europe, the US and Australia, the full burden is being imposed on the working class. The government has cut thousands of public sector jobs, increased the regressive Goods and Services Tax (GST), privatized companies, starved health and education sectors of funds and pushed thousands of vulnerable people off welfare.”

Source: www.wsws.org

Greek public sector workers strike over pension reforms

Public sector workers, including hospital staff, go on strike to protest pension cuts and tax increases sought by foreign lenders. “Our strike is just a warm-up, we will stage a 48-hour strike when the government submits the bill (to parliament) with the measures,” said Odysseas Drivalas, a leader of ADEDY, Greece’s 500,000 member public sector union. "Workers have lost almost half of their income since the crisis started, they cannot bear any more of this burden. With labour action, we can at least put pressure on them (the government)." Privatisations are part of the austerity program, and Germany is demanding 50 billion euros in privatisation revenues.

Source: U.K.

Workers protest against the privatization of the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG)

Workers protest against the privatization of the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation (OLG). “‘We're seeing the results of yet another attempt by the Liberal government to privatize a profitable crown company,’ [said] Sharon DeSousa, Regional Executive Vice-President for PSAC Ontario. ‘OLG is forcing its workers to give up their pension protections so that its casinos and slots become more attractive to private sector buyers under the so-called Modernization Plan.’”

Source: peopleoverprof.it