pop-logo-verticalCreated with Sketch.

News (41)

View all >

CUPE denounces the plans to build a new prison using a public-private partnership

CUPE Newfoundland (@CupeNL) denounces Dwight Ball, the premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, for planning to build a new prison using a ‘public-private partnership.’ “Naturally, Ernst & Young recommended using a public-private partnership. P3s= higher-cost private financing, ‘off book debts’ now that will mean less available funding in future years.”

Source: Twitter

New bill by Ontario Conservatives paves the way to privatization

Despite assurances from the government that they will not use new health restructuring legislation to privatize services, “key sections of Bill 74 are designed to do just that,” warns Michael Hurley, the president of the Ontario Council of Hospital Unions/CUPE. “One of those sections explicitly removes reference to keeping hospital and other health services public and not-for-profit.”

Source: Canadian Union of Public Employees

Documents (6)

View all >

pdf

Back in house: Why local governments are bringing services home

Share this page in your online social circles Share this Jun 2, 2016 Back in house: Why local governments are bringing services home, a new report from the Columbia Institute, is about the emerging trend of remunicipalization. Services that were once outsourced are finding their way back home. Most often, they are coming home because in-house services cost less. The bottom-line premise of cost savings through outsourcing is not proving to be as advertised. The report examines the Canadian environment for local governments, shares 15 Canadian case studies about returning services, follows-up and reports back on two earlier studies promoting contracted out services, provides a scan of international findings, and shares some best practices and governance checkpoints for bringing services back in house.

pdf

Public risks, private profits.VEOLIA environment. Profiles of Canada’s public-private partnership industry.

New research exposes the risks of privatizing Canada’s water and wastewater systems by entering into public-private partnerships with one of the world’s biggest corporations. The in-depth profile of water multinational Veolia Environment is the second in a series produced jointly by CUPE and the Polaris Institute.The Public risks, private profits series is an important tool for communities challenging P3s.