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CUPE denounces the plans to build a new prison using a public-private partnership

CUPE Newfoundland (@CupeNL) denounces Dwight Ball, the premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, for planning to build a new prison using a ‘public-private partnership.’ “Naturally, Ernst & Young recommended using a public-private partnership. P3s= higher-cost private financing, ‘off book debts’ now that will mean less available funding in future years.”

Source: Twitter

CUPE NS calls for transparency legislation governing public-private partnerships

CUPE Nova Scotia calls for transparency legislation governing ‘public-private partnerships.’ “The recommendations are based on research and discussion coming out of a panel discussion on P3s and transparency held in Halifax on November 13, 2018. ‘We need to stop the drain on our finances, and one of the first steps we can take is to legislate disclosure in reporting how our money is spent,’ says CUPE Nova Scotia President Nan McFadgen. ‘There should be no secrets when public money is spent on public infrastructure and services.’”

Source: Canadian Union of Public Employees

Why pay more to get less? P3 deal wrong way to build highway

Nova Scotia highway workers, represented by CUPE 1867, have launched a radio ad “asking the province not to use a public-private partnership (P3) to construct a new stretch of Highway 104.” Steve Joy, president of CUPE Local 1867, “says while he is pleased with the highway twinning project that is long overdue, he still has concerns about public safety when it comes to contracting out snow and ice removal. ‘Will this highway be maintained to the same high standards as our public roads if the contractor decides to cut corners or wages to turn a profit?’ “Also, can a private, for-profit company clear and maintain highways for less than our own Department of Transportation?’ asks Joy.”

Source: Canadian Union of Public Employees

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Asking the right questions: A guide for municipalities considering P3s

In this guide, economist John Loxley takes a critical look at the case for and against using public-private partnerships (P3s) for municipal infrastructure.His analysis goes beyond the claims made by P3 promoters to examine the costs and consequences of privatizing vital community assets. Through a series of questions, Dr. Loxley outlines the problems that accompany infrastructure and service privatization, and highlights the value of keeping vital assets and services public. With growing financial and political pressure on municipalities to use P3s, this guide is a timely resource that answers key questions about financing and delivering infrastructure projects. With this guide, municipal councillors and civic officials will be able to ask the right questions before considering entering into a P3.