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CUPE NS calls for transparency legislation governing public-private partnerships

CUPE Nova Scotia calls for transparency legislation governing ‘public-private partnerships.’ “The recommendations are based on research and discussion coming out of a panel discussion on P3s and transparency held in Halifax on November 13, 2018. ‘We need to stop the drain on our finances, and one of the first steps we can take is to legislate disclosure in reporting how our money is spent,’ says CUPE Nova Scotia President Nan McFadgen. ‘There should be no secrets when public money is spent on public infrastructure and services.’”

Source: Canadian Union of Public Employees

CUPE is raising concerns about the lack of transparency at Canada’s infrastructure bank

The Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) is raising concerns about the lack of transparency at Canada’s infrastructure bank. “Bank CEO Pierre Lavallée recently told a friendly crowd at the annual conference of the Canadian Council for Public-Private Partnerships the bank has looked at 55 potential projects – half of which are unsolicited ideas from corporations designed to feed their bottom lines, not serve the public interest. (…) With work clearly underway behind the scenes, Canadians need full transparency about the bank and the projects it’s considering. The CIB takes aim at our roads, bridges, water and transit systems, and will hand unprecedented control of critical projects to for-profit corporations. As Canadians, we’ve built this infrastructure together. It belongs to us all, and it’s not for sale.”

Source: Canadian Union of Public Employees

Why pay more to get less? P3 deal wrong way to build highway

Nova Scotia highway workers, represented by CUPE 1867, have launched a radio ad “asking the province not to use a public-private partnership (P3) to construct a new stretch of Highway 104.” Steve Joy, president of CUPE Local 1867, “says while he is pleased with the highway twinning project that is long overdue, he still has concerns about public safety when it comes to contracting out snow and ice removal. ‘Will this highway be maintained to the same high standards as our public roads if the contractor decides to cut corners or wages to turn a profit?’ “Also, can a private, for-profit company clear and maintain highways for less than our own Department of Transportation?’ asks Joy.”

Source: Canadian Union of Public Employees

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Back in house: Why local governments are bringing services home

Share this page in your online social circles Share this Jun 2, 2016 Back in house: Why local governments are bringing services home, a new report from the Columbia Institute, is about the emerging trend of remunicipalization. Services that were once outsourced are finding their way back home. Most often, they are coming home because in-house services cost less. The bottom-line premise of cost savings through outsourcing is not proving to be as advertised. The report examines the Canadian environment for local governments, shares 15 Canadian case studies about returning services, follows-up and reports back on two earlier studies promoting contracted out services, provides a scan of international findings, and shares some best practices and governance checkpoints for bringing services back in house.

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Public risks, private profits.VEOLIA environment. Profiles of Canada’s public-private partnership industry.

New research exposes the risks of privatizing Canada’s water and wastewater systems by entering into public-private partnerships with one of the world’s biggest corporations. The in-depth profile of water multinational Veolia Environment is the second in a series produced jointly by CUPE and the Polaris Institute.The Public risks, private profits series is an important tool for communities challenging P3s.

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