News (87)

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Privatization scheme bribery case ends with guilty plea on least serious charge

A series of criminal trials over a bribery scandal over a P3 privatization scheme ended last week with people admitting that $22.5 million in bribes were paid, but with no one being convicted of actually paying them. For those naïve enough to believe that the justice system does a good job of policing the privatization industry, it was a very bad week.

Source: PSI

The idea of a partial privatization of Canada’s health system

A senior official of the Ontario Medical Association, Dr. Charles S. Shaver, has floated the idea of a partial privatization of Canada’s health system in an op-ed. “One thing Canada can do less expensively than the United States is deliver health care. Much more controversial is whether to amend the Canada Health Act to permit a limited amount of privatization for residents of Canada. Each provincial medical association could coordinate this by polling its members and asking persons to identify themselves if they have ever worked in nations with blended public/private health care systems. Those with first-hand knowledge of such systems would be invited to participate in town hall meetings across each province. They would field questions concerning the pros and cons of health delivery in each country. If the public then became more receptive to modifications of our current single-payer system, politicians might more openly support these proposals.”

CUPE NS calls for transparency legislation governing public-private partnerships

CUPE Nova Scotia calls for transparency legislation governing ‘public-private partnerships.’ “The recommendations are based on research and discussion coming out of a panel discussion on P3s and transparency held in Halifax on November 13, 2018. ‘We need to stop the drain on our finances, and one of the first steps we can take is to legislate disclosure in reporting how our money is spent,’ says CUPE Nova Scotia President Nan McFadgen. ‘There should be no secrets when public money is spent on public infrastructure and services.’”

Source: Canadian Union of Public Employees

Documents (14)

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Private Clinics and the Threat to Public Medicare in Canada. Results of Surveys with Private Clinics and Patients

The Ontario Health Coalition has released a report on private healthcare clinics and how they are a threat to Canada's public Medicare system. “The report calls on federal and provincial governments to recommit themselves to the Canada Health Act, to stop illegal health fees for patients and to impose penalties on provinces that don't protect their residents. The report also calls for provincial governments to put a halt on the privatization of public and non-profit hospital services, increase hospital capacity and increase health funding. The report also recommends that governments at all levels must protect public health care from international trade agreements through a general carve out for all healthcare services. Private for-profit clinics are cutting a second tier into Canada's public healthcare system, a representative with a provincial healthcare watchdog group says. And, in many cases, what they’re doing is illegal, said Peter Boyle, a volunteer with the Ontario Health Coalition.” OPSEU President Warren (Smokey) Thomas says “these private clinics should not be profiting off the sick and elderly. It's outrageous and unethical, and that's why we will continue to fight against privatization in all its forms.

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Trashed: How Outsourcing Municipal Solid Waste Collection Kicks Workers to the Curb

This research examines how the outsourcing of the municipal solid waste collection services in Winnipeg has impacted the quality of jobs for those who work in this industry. Our research shows that the outsourcing of these services has resulted in many of these positions being filled through temporary help agencies (THA) and that the quality of this type of work is very precarious.

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Asking the right questions: A guide for municipalities considering P3s

In this guide, economist John Loxley takes a critical look at the case for and against using public-private partnerships (P3s) for municipal infrastructure.His analysis goes beyond the claims made by P3 promoters to examine the costs and consequences of privatizing vital community assets. Through a series of questions, Dr. Loxley outlines the problems that accompany infrastructure and service privatization, and highlights the value of keeping vital assets and services public. With growing financial and political pressure on municipalities to use P3s, this guide is a timely resource that answers key questions about financing and delivering infrastructure projects. With this guide, municipal councillors and civic officials will be able to ask the right questions before considering entering into a P3.

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