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PPP model: debt and transparency risks

A new report by Peruvian researchers Germán Alarco Tosoni and Ciro Salazar Valdivia through LATINDD reveals debt and transparency risks in the PPP model and provides recommendations. The study “includes the experience of PPPs implemented in Peru and the cost that these have had for the government of this country, as well as the overcosts that they have had during realization. Among the main problems that this business model implies, the lack of evaluation mechanisms to define whether the APP model is the best option for project execution; It also carries fiscal risks because the PPP dealership plays the same role as a public debt holder; finally the text also considers the weaknesses that the project can have in the planning stages, in the institutionality of the country in which it is developed and the transparency with which the works will be executed.”

Source: LATINDADD

The IMF and PPPs: A master class in double-speak

María José Romero and Gino Brunswijck of Eurodad say the International Monetary Fund (IMF) is simultaneously warning about the fiscal effects of ‘public-private partnerships’ and promoting them. “The advice of the IMF seems to lack coherence when it comes to PPPs. On the one hand the IMF recognises the fiscal risks associated with PPPs in its policy advice, while on the other there is a continued push for fiscal austerity measures, which has paved the way for the introduction of PPPs in many countries.”consolidation.

Source: Bretton Woods Project

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History RePPPeated - How public private partnerships are failing

Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) are increasingly being promoted as the solution to the shortfall in financing needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Economic infrastructure, such as railways, roads, airports and ports, but also key services such as health, education, water and electricity are being delivered through PPPs in both the global north and south. This report gives an in-depth, evidence-based analysis of the impact of 10 PPP projects that have taken place across four continents, in both developed and developing countries. These case studies build on research conducted by civil society experts in recent years and have been written by the people who often work with and around the communities affected by these projects.

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Conflict of interest: how corporations that profit from privatisation are helping write UN standards on PPPs Briefing by Public Services International to UNECE Working Party on PPPs

The UNECE Working Party on PPPs is attempting to create guiding principles and international standards on PPPs. With this in mind, the UNECE established a Roster of PPP Experts, “open to PPP practitioners with relevant experience in delivering PPP programmes” 5 to serve as advisors and enablers for the process. An analysis of this Roster conducted by PSI found that 190 of the 360 “Experts” named on the roster, come from the private sector; civil society representation is virtually non-existent; workers and unions, who have first hand experience in dealing with PPPs and face the consequence of failures, are entirely missing from the list of experts and advisory functions...PSI also presented a series of brief case studies on the practices of companies represented on the UNECE Roster of PPP Experts and Business Advisory Board, examining their past involvement in PPPs and analysing aspects of their financial practices.