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Jakarta should just return water management to the public

The Jakarta Post says that “instead of confusing the public with legal technicalities of contract restructuring, Jakarta should just return water management to the public. Like Paris, it should form a Water Observatory, a space where citizens can ensure that the water company is publicly held accountable.” The media outlet was responding to a demonstration by Jakarta residents on World Water Day demanding “that water management be returned to the public, as part of a global trend called ‘remunicipalisation.’”

Source: The Jakarta Post

Why are so many cities choosing to end privatisation and return to public water services?

The launch of the book Our public water future: The global experience with remunicipalisation comes in the wake of Jakarta’s decision in March 2015 to annul its privatised water contracts citing the violation of the 9.9 million residents’ human right to water. This is the largest remunicipalisation in the world. The report reveals that over the last 15 years, 235 cases of water remunicipalisation have been recorded in 37 countries, impacting on more than 100 million people. Moreover the pace of remunicipalisation is accelerating dramatically, doubling in the 2010-2015 period compared with 2000-2010.

Source: www.world-psi.org

The global experience with remunicipalisation

TNI, PSIRU, Multinational Observatory, MSP and EPSU have launched a new book on the emerging remunicipalisation trend and the questions it poses about the future of water privatisation. PSI Deputy General Secretary David Boys says, “This new report confirms the acceleration of remunicipalisation in the past five years. We ask the World Bank and other development actors to integrate these findings into their policies and programmes and to immediately stop imposing failed privatisation around the world.”

Source: www.world-psi.org

Documents (1)

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pdf

Water Privatisation and Remunicipalisation: International Lessons for Jakarta

This report provides background to the current court case and public debate about the privatised Jakarta water concessions. It seeks to provide international empirical experience concerning privatisation and the role of public sector in water services, in the framework of water as a human right. It uses this experience to identify distinctive features of the Jakarta contracts, and to discuss parallels between the experiences in Jakarta and in the rest of the world. Finally, it offers conclusions in relation to the possible future of water services in Jakarta.

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