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CUPE denounces the plans to build a new prison using a public-private partnership

CUPE Newfoundland (@CupeNL) denounces Dwight Ball, the premier of Newfoundland and Labrador, for planning to build a new prison using a ‘public-private partnership.’ “Naturally, Ernst & Young recommended using a public-private partnership. P3s= higher-cost private financing, ‘off book debts’ now that will mean less available funding in future years.”

Source: Twitter

PPP model: debt and transparency risks

A new report by Peruvian researchers Germán Alarco Tosoni and Ciro Salazar Valdivia through LATINDD reveals debt and transparency risks in the PPP model and provides recommendations. The study “includes the experience of PPPs implemented in Peru and the cost that these have had for the government of this country, as well as the overcosts that they have had during realization. Among the main problems that this business model implies, the lack of evaluation mechanisms to define whether the APP model is the best option for project execution; It also carries fiscal risks because the PPP dealership plays the same role as a public debt holder; finally the text also considers the weaknesses that the project can have in the planning stages, in the institutionality of the country in which it is developed and the transparency with which the works will be executed.”

Source: LATINDADD

The IMF and PPPs: A master class in double-speak

María José Romero and Gino Brunswijck of Eurodad say the International Monetary Fund (IMF) is simultaneously warning about the fiscal effects of ‘public-private partnerships’ and promoting them. “The advice of the IMF seems to lack coherence when it comes to PPPs. On the one hand the IMF recognises the fiscal risks associated with PPPs in its policy advice, while on the other there is a continued push for fiscal austerity measures, which has paved the way for the introduction of PPPs in many countries.”consolidation.

Source: Bretton Woods Project

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History RePPPeated - How public private partnerships are failing

Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) are increasingly being promoted as the solution to the shortfall in financing needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Economic infrastructure, such as railways, roads, airports and ports, but also key services such as health, education, water and electricity are being delivered through PPPs in both the global north and south. This report gives an in-depth, evidence-based analysis of the impact of 10 PPP projects that have taken place across four continents, in both developed and developing countries. These case studies build on research conducted by civil society experts in recent years and have been written by the people who often work with and around the communities affected by these projects.

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CSOs as equal partners in monitoring public finance

CSOs as equal partners in monitoring public finance started from 2016 with the aim to improve accountability and transparency of the public finance in targeted countries and strengthen Civil Society Organisations’ (CSOs) role and voice in monitoring the institutions’ performance in that area. Key project activities are research and monitoring, advocacy, capacity building and transfer of knowledge/practices and networking in the field of the 4 specific topics: • public debt, • public-private partnerships, • tax equity and • infrastructure projects. More about the project and our work can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/BalkanMonitoringPublicFinance/