pop-logo-verticalCreated with Sketch.

External articles (9)

View all >

The European Court of Justice has set back efforts to privatize ambulance services

The European Court of Justice has set back efforts to privatize ambulance services. “In Germany, state and local governments are responsible for organizing the emergency services. In many cases, they appoint non-profit organizations such as the Red Cross or the Maltese Relief Service to bring emergency patients to the hospital. Often these contracts are awarded without Europe-wide tenders.” The ECJ upheld this practice, which was being challenged by the private, for-profit Falck group of companies from Denmark. In the United States, privatization of public ambulance services has created serious problems.

Source: DIE WELT

A new film explores the phenomenon of the “market-driven patient” in hospitals

A new film explores the phenomenon of the “market-driven patient” in hospitals. “The film makes an impressive and frightening portrayal of physicians, nurses and patients in hospitals everyday. Staff shortages, stress, investment backlog and often inadequate compensation for hospital treatment after the introduction of DRGs led to loss of quality of patient care and the closure of departments or whole houses. Other heavily indebted institutions were privatized and now produce high returns to shareholders.”

Source: www.localbook.de

The DGB called for “a forward-looking human resources policy”

On the occasion of the United Nations Public Service Day, the deputy head of the German Trade Union Confederation (DGB), Elke Hannack, called for a forward-looking personnel policy by public employers, including more hiring and training, and provision of attractive working conditions and pay offers. The DGB called for “a forward-looking human resources policy.” The civil service was characterized in Germany for many years by privatization and job cuts. On June 22, the Federal Statistical Office said that more staff have been hired for the public service again, 47,500 employees more than in the previous year, for an overall total of 4,740,000.

Source: www.dgb.de

Publications (2)

View all >

pdf

Our City, Our Grid: The energy remunicipalisation trend in Germany (By Sören Becker)

This chapter gives an account of remunicipalisations in the German energy sector, and is divided into two main parts. The first section discusses the different factors enabling remunicipalisation. The second section turns to the politics and strategies behind two remunicipalisation cases in Hamburg, contrasting a more consensual and top-down variant of remunicipalisation with one that involved more conflictual public mobilisation and direct democracy.