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When Electricity Means Life

Primah Kwagala of the Center for Health, Human Rights and Development in Uganda writes that health facilities should not be targeted by privatised energy providers. “When Uganda’s privatized electricity supplier shuts off power to hospitals, the results are catastrophic. In 2012, 150 babies on oxygen concentrators at a hospital in Jinja died after utility company UMEME Uganda Limited turned off the electricity with no prior notice. In 2015, Kiboga District Hospital was without power for over a month. UMEME disconnected the supply because the government of Uganda had not paid the bill of over 100 million Uganda Shillings (US$26,600). The utility has a right to be paid for the services it provides. But when it comes to hospitals, the consequences are too grave for such hard and fast rules.”

Source: allAfrica.com

There is renewed controversy over the contract, performance and tariff collected by electricity distributor, Umeme

There is renewed controversy over the contract, performance and tariff collected by electricity distributor, Umeme, the private, listed company that has held a 20 year electricity distribution concession since March 2005. President Museveni has expressed his dissatisfaction. The issue “brings back the question of competence and due diligence by government officials and institutions who oversee public trust. It also suggests there are issues of technical and financial competences, and business ethical behaviour by service providers who often take advantage to cheat as they make colossal profits.”

Source: www.mediacentre.go.ug